ICC Chief Prosecutor’s Statement on the conclusion of the preliminary examination of the situation in Nigeria

SUBSCRIBE on Youtube:

Today, I announce the conclusion of the preliminary examination of the situation in Nigeria.

As I stated last year at the annual Assembly of States Parties, before I end my term as Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (“ICC” or the “Court”), I intend to reach determinations on all files that have been under preliminary examination under my tenure, as far as I am able. In that statement, I also indicated the high likelihood that several preliminary examinations would progress to the investigative stage. Following a thorough process, I can announce today that the statutory criteria for opening an investigation into the situation in Nigeria have been met.

Specifically, my Office has concluded that there is a reasonable basis to believe that members of Boko Haram and its splinter groups have committed the following acts constituting crimes against humanity and war crimes: murder; rape, sexual slavery, including forced pregnancy and forced marriage; enslavement; torture; cruel treatment; outrages upon personal dignity; taking of hostages; intentionally directing attacks against the civilian population or against individual civilians not taking direct part in hostilities; intentionally directing attacks against personnel, installations, material, units or vehicles involved in a humanitarian assistance; intentionally directing attacks against buildings dedicated to education and to places of worship and similar institutions; conscripting and enlisting children under the age of fifteen years into armed groups and using them to participate actively in hostilities; persecution on gender and religious grounds; and other inhumane acts.

While my Office recognises that the vast majority of criminality within the situation is attributable to non-state actors, we have also found a reasonable basis to believe that members of the Nigerian Security Forces (“NSF”) have committed the following acts constituting crimes against humanity and war crimes: murder, rape, torture, and cruel treatment; enforced disappearance; forcible transfer of population; outrages upon personal dignity; intentionally directing attacks against the civilian population as such and against individual civilians not taking direct part in hostilities; unlawful imprisonment; conscripting and enlisting children under the age of fifteen years into armed forces and using them to participate actively in hostilities; persecution on gender and political grounds; and other inhumane acts.

These allegations are also sufficiently grave to warrant investigation by my Office, both in quantitative and qualitative terms. My Office will provide further details in our forthcoming annual Report on Preliminary Examination Activities.

The preliminary examination has been lengthy not because of the findings on crimes – indeed, as early as 2013, the Office announced its findings on crimes in Nigeria, which have been updated regularly since. The duration of the preliminary examination, open since 2010, was due to the priority given by my Office in supporting the Nigerian authorities in investigating and prosecuting these crimes domestically.

It has always been my conviction that the goals of the Rome Statute are best served by States executing their own primary responsibility to ensure accountability at the national level. I have repeatedly stressed my aspiration for the ability of the Nigerian judicial system to address these alleged crimes. We have engaged in multiple missions to Nigeria to support national efforts, shared our own assessments, and invited the authorities to act. We have seen some efforts made by the prosecuting authorities in Nigeria to hold members of Boko Haram to account in recent years, primarily against low-level captured fighters for membership in a terrorist organisation. The military authorities have also informed me that they have examined, and dismissed, allegations against their own troops.

I have given ample time for these proceedings to progress, bearing in mind the overarching requirements of partnership and vigilance that must guide our approach to complementarity. However, our assessment is that none of these proceedings relate, even indirectly, to the forms of conduct or categories of persons that would likely form the focus of my investigations. And while this does not foreclose the possibility for the authorities to conduct relevant and genuine proceedings, it does mean that, as things stand, the requirements under the Statute are met for my Office to proceed.

Moving forward, the next step will be to request authorisation from the Judges of the Pre-Trial Chamber of the Court to open investigations. The Office faces a situation where several preliminary examinations have reached or are approaching the same stage, at a time when we remain gripped by operational challenges brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, on the one hand, and by the limitations of our operational capacity due to overextended resources, on the other. This is also occurring in the context of the pressures the pandemic is placing on the global economy. Against this backdrop, in the immediate period ahead, we will need to take several strategic and operational decisions on the prioritisation of the Office’s workload, which also duly take into account the legitimate expectations of victims and affected communities as well as other stakeholders. This is a matter that I will also  discuss with the incoming Prosecutor, once elected, as part of the transition discussions I intend to have. In the interim, my Office will continue to take the necessary measures to ensure the integrity of future investigations in relation to the situation in Nigeria.

The predicament we are confronted with due to capacity constraints underscores the clear mismatch between the resources afforded to my Office and the ever growing demands placed upon it. It is a situation that requires not only prioritization on behalf of the Office, to which we remain firmly committed, but also open and frank discussions with the Assembly of States Parties, and other stakeholders of the Rome Statute system, on the real resource needs of my Office in order to effectively execute its statutory mandate.

As we move towards the next steps concerning the situation in Nigeria, I count on the full support of the Nigerian authorities, as well as of the Assembly of States Parties more generally, on whose support the Court ultimately depends. And as we look ahead to future investigations in the independent and impartial exercise of our mandate, I also look forward to a constructive and collaborative exchange with the Government of Nigeria to determine how justice may best be served under the shared framework of complementary domestic and international action.

The Office of the Prosecutor of the ICC conducts independent and impartial preliminary examinations, investigations and prosecutions of the crime of genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and the crime of aggression. Since 2003, the Office has been conducting investigations in multiple situations within the ICC’s jurisdiction, namely in Uganda; the Democratic Republic of the Congo; Darfur, Sudan; the Central African Republic (two distinct situations); Kenya; Libya; Côte d’Ivoire; Mali; Georgia, Burundi Bangladesh/Myanmar and Afghanistan (subject to a pending article 18 deferral request). The Office is also currently conducting preliminary examinations relating to the situations in Bolivia; Colombia; Guinea; the Philippines; Ukraine; and Venezuela (I and II), while the situation in Palestine is pending a judicial ruling.

For further details on “preliminary examinations” and “situations and cases” before the Court, click here, and here.

Source: Office of the Prosecutor | OTPNewsDesk@icc-cpi.int

Communiqué de presse: 11.12.2020

Déclaration du Procureur de la Cour pénale internationale, Mme Fatou Bensouda, au sujet de la conclusion de l’examen préliminaire de la situation au Nigéria

Aujourd’hui, j’annonce la conclusion de l’examen préliminaire de la situation au Nigéria.

Comme je l’ai déclaré l’an dernier lors de l’Assemblée annuelle des États Parties, j’ai l’intention, avant que je quitte mes fonctions de Procureur de la Cour pénale internationale (« CPI »  ou la « Cour »), de parvenir dans la mesure du possible à une décision concernant l’ensemble des situations qui ont fait l’objet d’un examen préliminaire sous mon mandat. J’avais alors affirmé qu’il était fort probable que plusieurs examens donnent lieu à l’ouverture d’une enquête et aujourd’hui, au terme d’une analyse rigoureuse, je suis en mesure d’annoncer que les critères prévus par le Statut de Rome pour l’ouverture d’une enquête dans la situation au Nigéria sont réunis.

En particulier, mon Bureau est parvenu à la conclusion qu’il existait une base raisonnable permettant de croire que des membres de Boko Haram et de ses groupes dissidents avaient commis les actes suivants constitutifs de crimes contre l’humanité et de crimes de guerre: le meurtre; le viol; l’esclavage sexuel, y compris la grossesse forcée et le mariage forcé; la réduction en esclavage; la torture; les traitements cruels; les atteintes à la dignité de la personne; la prise d’otages; le fait de diriger intentionnellement des attaques contre la population civile ou contre des civils qui ne prennent pas directement part aux hostilités; le fait de diriger intentionnellement des attaques contre le personnel, les installations, le matériel, les unités ou les véhicules employés dans le cadre d’une mission d’aide humanitaire; le fait de diriger intentionnellement des attaques contre des bâtiments consacrés à l’enseignement, des lieux de culte et des institutions similaires; le fait de procéder à la conscription et à l’enrôlement d’enfants de moins de 15 ans dans des groupes armés et de les faire participer activement à des hostilités; la persécution pour des motifs sexistes et religieux ; et d’autres actes inhumains.

Même si mon Bureau admet que la grande majorité des crimes commis dans le cadre de la situation sont imputables à des acteurs non étatiques, il a également déterminé qu’il existait une base raisonnable permettant de croire que des membres des forces de sécurité nigérianes avaient commis les actes suivants constitutifs de crimes contre l’humanité et de crimes de guerre: le meurtre, le viol, la torture et les traitements cruels; la disparition forcée; le transfert forcé de populations; des atteintes à la dignité de la personne; le fait de diriger intentionnellement des attaques contre la population civile en tant que telle ou contre des personnes civiles qui ne participent pas directement aux hostilités; la détention illégale ; le fait de procéder à la conscription et à l’enrôlement d’enfants de moins de 15 ans dans des groupes armés et de les faire participer activement à des hostilités; la persécution pour des motifs sexistes et politiques; et d’autres actes inhumains.

De surcroît, ces allégations sont suffisamment graves, de par leur nombre et leur nature, pour que mon Bureau ouvre une enquête. Mon Bureau communiquera de plus amples détails dans son prochain Rapport annuel sur les activités en matière d’examen préliminaire.

Cet examen préliminaire se poursuit depuis de longues années, mais ce n’est pas parce que le Bureau a mis du temps à se prononcer sur les crimes commis au Nigéria, puisqu’il avait fait part dès 2013 de ses conclusions à ce sujet, et les a régulièrement mis à jour depuis lors. La longueur de cet examen préliminaire, ouvert depuis 2010, s’explique plutôt par le fait que mon Bureau s’est surtout attaché à soutenir les autorités nigérianes dans leurs activités menées à l’échelle nationale en vue d’enquêter sur ces crimes et d’en poursuivre les auteurs.

J’ai toujours été convaincue que, pour remplir au mieux les objectifs visés par le Statut de Rome, il était préférable que les États assument leur responsabilité première qui est de veiller à ce que les responsables des crimes rendent des comptent devant des juridictions nationales. J’ai maintes fois répété que j’espérais que l’appareil judiciaire nigérian soit en mesure de juger ces crimes. Nous sommes allés plusieurs fois en mission au Nigéria pour soutenir les actions menées à l’échelle nationale, avons fait part de notre analyse de la situation et avons invité les autorités à agir. Nous avons constaté que le Parquet nigérian avait, ces dernières années, engagé des poursuites contre des membres de Boko Haram, en grande partie des combattants de rang inférieur qui avaient été capturés, pour qu’ils répondent de leur appartenance à une organisation terroriste. Les autorités militaires m’ont également informée qu’elles avaient examiné les allégations portées contre leurs soldats avant de les rejeter.

J’ai accordé tout le temps qu’il fallait pour que ces procédures aboutissent sans jamais perdre de vue les exigences primordiales de collaboration et de vigilance qui doivent guider notre conception de la complémentarité. Cela étant, nous pensons qu’aucune de ces procédures n’est liée de près ou de loin aux types de comportement ou aux catégories de personne qui seraient susceptibles de faire l’objet de mes enquêtes. Certes, les autorités nigérianes peuvent toujours mener véritablement à bien des procédures appropriées, mais cela ne veut pas dire qu’en l’état actuel des choses, les conditions posées par le Statut sont remplies pour que le Bureau donne suite.

Notre prochaine étape consistera à demander aux juges de la Chambre préliminaire de la Cour de nous autoriser à ouvrir une enquête. Le Bureau se trouve dans une situation où plusieurs examens préliminaires ont atteint le même stade ou s’en approchent, à un moment où nous continuons de nous heurter à des difficultés dans nos opérations en raison, d’une part, de la pandémie de COVID-19 et, d’autre part, de notre capacité d’action limitée à cause des faibles ressources extrêmement sollicitées dont nous disposons. Nous subissons également les pressions exercées par cette pandémie sur l’économie mondiale. À cet égard, dans nos opérations à court terme, nous devrons faire des choix stratégiques en termes de priorités pour le Bureau, qui tiennent dûment compte des attentes légitimes des victimes, des communautés touchées et d’autres parties prenantes. Il s’agit d’une question que j’évoquerai également avec mon successeur dès qu’il sera élu, lors des discussions que je compte avoir au moment de la période de transition. Entre-temps, mon Bureau continuera de prendre les mesures qui s’imposent pour garantir l’intégrité des futures enquêtes dans le cadre de la situation au Nigéria.

La fâcheuse situation dans laquelle nous nous trouvons compte tenu des restrictions que nous subissons en termes de capacité montre bien les disparités qui existent entre les ressources dont dispose mon Bureau et les exigences toujours plus grandes auxquelles il doit satisfaire. Il s’agit d’une situation dans laquelle il convient non seulement d’établir des priorités pour le Bureau, pour lequel notre engagement reste entier, mais aussi d’engager de franches discussions avec l’Assemblées des États parties, et d’autres parties prenantes du système mis en place par le Statut de Rome, sur les véritables besoins en ressources de mon Bureau afin de pouvoir remplir efficacement son mandat.

Au moment de prendre ces nouvelles mesures dans le cadre de la situation au Nigéria, je compte sur le soutien total des autorités nigérianes, et plus généralement de l’Assemblée des États parties, dont dépend fondamentalement la Cour. En outre, pour ce qui des enquêtes à venir que nous mènerons dans l’exercice de notre mandat en toute indépendance et impartialité, j’espère aussi que nos échanges avec les autorités nigérianes seront fructueux et constructifs dans l’optique de déterminer comment servir au mieux la justice dans le cadre commun d’une action complémentaire à l’échelle nationale et internationale.

Le Bureau du Procureur de la CPI mène des examens préliminaires, des enquêtes et des poursuites à propos du crime de génocide, des crimes contre l’humanité, des crimes de guerre et du crime d’agression, en toute impartialité et en toute indépendance. Depuis 2003, le Bureau enquête sur plusieurs situations relevant de la compétence de la CPI, notamment en Afghanistan (demande de sursis à enquêter présentée au titre de l’article 18 en suspens), au Bangladesh/Myanmar, au Burundi, en Côte d’Ivoire, au Darfour (Soudan), en Géorgie, au Kenya, en Libye, au Mali, en Ouganda, en République centrafricaine (deux situations distinctes) et en République démocratique du Congo. Le Bureau conduit également des examens préliminaires à propos des situations en Bolivie, en Colombie, en Guinée, aux Philippines, en Ukraine et au Venezuela (I et II) et attend qu’une décision judiciaire soit rendue dans le cadre de la situation en Palestine.

Pour en savoir plus sur les « examens préliminaires » et les « situations et affaires » portées devant la Cour, veuillez cliquer ici et ici.

Source: Bureau du Procureur | OTPNewsDesk@icc-cpi.int